New Book: Migration in Performance

There is another newly published title in the Routledge Research Series in Place, Space and Politics Migration in Performance by Caleb Johnston and Gerry Pratt. For a full list of the books in the Series, look here.

Here is the book description:

“This book follows the travels of Nanay, a testimonial theatre play developed from research with migrant domestic workers in Canada, as it was recreated and restaged in different places around the globe. This work examines how Canadian migration policy is embedded across and within histories of colonialism in the Philippines and settler colonialism in Canada. Translations between scholarship and performance – and between Canada and the Philippines – became more uneasy as the play travelled internationally, raising pressing questions of how decolonial collaborations might take shape in practice. This book examines the strengths and limits of existing framings of Filipina migration and offers rich ideas of how care – the care of children and elderly and each other – might be rethought in radically new ways within less violently unequal relations that span different colonial histories and complex triangulations of racialised migrants, settlers and Indigenous peoples.

This book is a journey towards a new way of doing and performing research and theory. It is part of a growing interdisciplinary exchange between the performing arts and social sciences and will appeal to researchers and students within human geography and performance studies, and those working on migration, colonialisms, documentary theatre and social reproduction.”

 

 

Waving not drowning

I gave a talk last week at the Martin School at the University of Oxford, on the findings of a research project ethical consumption – part of a series this Autumn on Certification and Sustainability. We have a book coming out from the project any time now, in time for Xmas, so this was a bit like a promotional gig. They filmed my performance, and have now posted it on their website. I have never actually watched myself talk before; it’s very odd. I seem to wave my hands around a lot, not sure to what purpose. It’s better in audio only.